Thursday, 6 July 2017

The Relationship between Winning and Losing in Silat Sea GAMES 2015 Singapore (Malaysia Team Male Class E and H)


Shapie, M. N. M (1,2) & Mohd Foad, M. F. (1)

1.Fakulti Sains Sukan dan Rekreasi, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor.




Abstract

The purpose of this study is to describe the skills used between winner match of Pencak Silat Class E and H Men during Sea Games in Singapore 2015. A video recording during the match was used for the analysis. The skills were coded into 13 categories which are punches, kick, sweep, Topple and others. The skills involve 3 outcomes which is hit target, hit elsewhere, and miss opponent. By using sample t-test used to analyses the data between winner and loser. Result shows that the winner used kicking, sweep and topple down techniques compared to the loser.

Introduction

Silat is the common name of the indigenous martial art of the Indonesian archipelago. There are many stories known about the origin of Silat but most probably it originated on the island of Jawa in the village of Cimande (it is also spelled as Chimande or Tjimande). However, Silat began to be practised, developed and spread in Malaysia and on the island of Sumatra nearly the same time as it appeared on Jawa. It later appeared on the southern part of Thailand and also in Singapore. Silat is also considered to be a traditional fighting art in Brunei, on the Philippines, in Cambodia and in Vietnam, as well. Therefore it is closely related to the other martial arts of Southeast Asia, such as Eskrima, Krabi Krabong of Thailand and Kuntao (that is also called “the Silat of the Chinese”). The practicioners of Silat are called pesilat in Malay. Silat is the essence of combat and self-defense, the true fighting application of the techniques.
            Silat can improve in self-defenses and it can be learned to use in competing a game which is it involve exciting, fun, and motivating for athlete. It creates involvement of the athletes in the class, larger excitement to improve and study new advanced skills, and motivating the athletes or the student in perform better in class. There are sparring may vary according to style and official matches follow the rule. Firstly, strikes are only legal if they hit between the shoulder line and the waist. Each successful strike is awarded one point. Second, hitting the face or below the belt is a penalty. Third, throws in themselves are not awarded points, and ground follow-up is permitted. Fourth, a joint-lock is awarded 10 points. Finally, immobilizing the opponent by holding them helpless is worth 5 points.
There is a lot of motion analysis of silat including punch, kick, block, sweep, topple, dodge, catch, self-release and others. Previous study has been studied about the activity profile during action time. According to Mohamed Shapie, Oliver, O’Donoghue, and Tong (2013) the nature of work periods within any combat sports depends on the frequency, volume and type of the activity being performed. The objective of this study is to describe the skills involved between the winner and loser as well as to determine the factor that influences the winner to win.

Material and Methods

A video recording of one male silat match from the national silat competition in Singapore (Sea Games 2015) was used for the analysis. This was quarterfinal, semifinal, and final match Class E Men Malaysia during Sea Games in Singapore 2015 was used for the analysis also final match Class H men Malaysia. Subsequent player motion analysis was carried out by download the video and watches the video in Youtube. I identify 13 different types of event performed by the male contestants as well as the start and end of action periods. Video sequences were repeated where necessary and the playback to allow accurate measurement of each offensive and defensive movement category. The video could be paused and played back to notate the each movement category. There are three rounds within one match and each round has two minute for fighting and one minute for resting. The skills were coded into five categories which is punch, kick, sweep, topple, block and others. Usage of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to calculate the statistical analysis and result. The video is repeated at least two times so the data can be taken properly. The frequency was taken as data to be analyzed.

Motion Categories 

Silat exponent’s motions were coded into 13 different types of categories and were defined as follows:

Punch: The punch ‘tumbuk’ attack is done by a hand with a closed fist hitting the target
Kick: The kick ‘tendang / terajang’ is an attacking movement which is performed with one leg or two legs simultaneously a kick can be aimed at any target
Block: The blocking movements using arms, elbows and legs with the purpose to block off or striking back at any attack
Catch: The catch ‘tangkapan’ is done by using the hand to obstruct the opponent from carrying out an attack.
Topple: There are various ways of toppling down one’s opponent. For example, a silat exponent ‘pesilat’ can either push or shove
Sweep: Swiping ‘sapuan’ involves attacking an opponent leg.
Evade/Dodge: The evade ‘elakan’ technique is carried out by silat exponent when he tries to evade an attack.
Self-Release: Self-release ‘lepas tangkapan’ technique is a technique to unlock any clinch or catch from an opponent.
Block and Punch: The blocking technique is used to block any hand or leg attack from the opponent and followed by counter attack using the hand to punch the opponent.
Block and Kick: The blocking technique is used to block any hand or leg attack from the opponent and followed by counter attack using the leg to kick the opponent.
Block and Sweep: The blocking technique is used to block any hand or leg attack from the opponent and followed by counter attack using sweeping technique to the opponent.
Fake Punch: An action which a silat exponent intends to confuse the opponent using a fake punch to break his opponent’s defensive posture.
Fake Kick: An action which a silat exponent intends to confuse the opponent using a fake kick to break his opponent defensive posture.



Statistical Analysis



MALAYSIA VS INDONESIA CATEGORY MEN’S CLASS E QUARTERFINALS (WIN)
ACTION
HIT
ELSEWHERE
HIT
TARGET
MISS
OPPONENT
TOTAL
COUNTRY
M
I
M
I
M
I
M
I
Block
1

1

1
1
3
1
Block & Punch



1



1
Block & Kick


3
1

2
3
3
Block & Sweep


1


2
1
2
Catch
1
1
2
2
2
4
5
7
Evade/Dodge


3
3


3
3
Fake Punch



1



1
Fake Kick
1
3
2

1
1
4
4
Kick
3
2
10
4
3
5
16
11
Punch
1

1
4

1
2
5
Self-release


2
1


2
1
Sweep


1

2
1
3
1
Topple


1

3
5
4
5
Total
7
6
27
17
12
22
46
45

Group Statistics

Group Statistics

GROUP
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
SCORE
MALAYSIA
3
15.3333
10.40833
6.00925
INDONESIA
3
15.0000
8.18535
4.72582






MALAYSIA VS SINGAPORE CATEGORY MEN’S CLASS E SEMIFINALS (WIN)
ACTION
HIT
ELSEWHERE
HIT
TARGET
MISS
OPPONENT
TOTAL
COUNTRY
M
S
M
S
M
S
M
S
Block


1


1
1
1
Block & Punch

2

1
1

1
3
Block & Kick


4
1
3
1
7
2
Block & Sweep








Catch
1

2
1
2

5
1
Evade/Dodge


3



3

Fake Punch


1



1

Fake Kick
2

1
1

1
3
2
Kick
3
6
5
2
2
9
10
17
Punch
2
3
2
6

1
4
10
Self-release








Sweep


2

2
1
4
1
Topple


4
1
1
1
5
2
Total
8
11
25
13
11
15
44
39

Group Statistics

Group Statistics

GROUP
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
SCORE
MALAYSIA
3
14.6667
9.07377
5.23874
SINGAPORE
3
13.0000
2.00000
1.15470






MALAYSIA VS VIETNAM CATEGORY MEN’S CLASS E FINAL (WIN)
ACTION
HIT
ELSEWHERE
HIT
TARGET
MISS
OPPONENT
TOTAL
COUNTRY
M
V
M
V
M
V
M
V
Block


2
1

1
2
2
Block & Punch



1

1

2
Block & Kick




2

2

Block & Sweep








Catch


10
1
5

15
1
Evage/Dodge

1





1
Fake Punch





1

1
Fake Kick

4

9
1
3
1
16
Kick
2
5
7
9
4
12
13
26
Punch
1
5
2


1
3
6
Self-release








Sweep


3

2
1
5
1
Topple


7
1
2
2
9
3
Total
3
15
31
22
17
22
51
59

Group Statistics

Group Statistics

GROUP
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
SCORE
MALAYSIA
3
17.0000
14.00000
8.08290
VIETNAM
3
19.6667
4.04145
2.33333







MALAYSIA VS INDONESIA CATEGORY MEN’S CLASS H FINAL (LOSE)
ACTION
HIT
ELSEWHERE
HIT
TARGET
MISS
OPPONENT
TOTAL
COUNTRY
M
I
M
I
M
I
M
I
Block



2



2
Block & Punch
1

4
3


5
3
Block & Kick








Block & Sweep


1

2
1
3
1
Catch
1
2
3
3


4
5
Evade/Dodge








Fake Punch


1



1

Fake Kick
1

2
2


3
2
Kick
11
8
12
15
6
1
29
24
Punch
3
4
3
12
3
2
9
18
Self-release

1
2
3
1

3
4
Sweep




1
2
1
2
Topple



2
3
4
3
6
Total
17
15
28
42
16
10
61
67

Group Statistics

Group Statistics

GROUP
N
Mean
Std. Deviation
Std. Error Mean
SCORE
MALAYSIA
3
20.3333
6.65833
3.84419
INDONESIA
3
22.3333
17.21434
9.93870







Discussion

As the result, Men’s Class E Malaysia versus Indonesia, Malaysia versus Singapore and Malaysia versus Indonesia win the match. Based on the table, the winner Malaysia Class E there hit target accurately by using kicking technique to fight the opponent also the use sweep and Topple. Based on the analysis, the winner used a good strategy to fight the opponent by seeing the weaknesses of the opponent and the loser has no opportunity to fight back if the winner uses kicking technique with kick and punch. Based on the video, kick with sweep technique is the best motion to topple down the loser. Besides that, Class H Malaysia he have low of percentage in winning the fight between Indonesia was tight because the opponent hit the target accurately between the Malaysia. The Malaysia not performs in skill technique so that the player is lost the match. It means that, during the match, the skills that are being used are mostly miss opponent.


Conclusion

In conclusion, Class E male Malaysia performed a very good performance he can completed his technique perfectly in the use of kick, sweep, and topple. The player does it because they hit more on target and less hit miss opponent. However, in class H male Vietnam the fighter is stronger in term of kick, punch and perfect block. Malaysia Class H loses because they are more using kick and punch miss and hit elsewhere. So that, they can improve the technique based on the opponent game play and change the skill technique to get the point.

Recommendation

In my opinion, it is not easy to be a silat champion. They need to train harder and sacrifice many things to achieve the champion status. The coach must give the suitable training in term of skill technique to give the improvement of the athletes. Coach needs the suitable of each category to a great fighter. The athletes must train hard to get the peak performance to the any match. They must perfect in the skill technique to bit the opponent in match. In advanced athletes should practice more on their target and technique in improve their performance especially on catch, dodge, punch, kick, sweep, and topple. Furthermore, video analysis can be a guidance to identify the athlete’s mistake also the strengths of the athlete so in the future can improved more.


References


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This article was submitted by Mohd Faiz bin Mohd Foad, an expert of martial arts. Did you find these article useful?
Email: cat.faiz1122@gmail.com

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The Relationship between Winning and Losing in Silat Sea GAMES 2015 Singapore (Malaysia Team Male Class E and H) Shapie, M. N. M  (...